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Marketing Round-Up – Q1 2016

Our clients have started 2016 strong by fielding numerous compelling features across different types of big media! Take a look at 2 of our clients’ stellar starts to this year.

 

Ticketbis

Mashable – Olympics Ticket Sales Fall Off A Cliff in Wake of Zika Virus

UPROXX –  The Zika Virus Is Wreaking Havoc On Brazilian Tourism And The 2016 Olympics

About.com – Super Bowl 50: Record Ticket Prices & Increased International Interest

WebInTravel – New Partners For Klook Travel, Ticketbis Launches in The U.S and More Countries Added For TripAdvisor Instant Booking

 

eZanga

Forbes – How Can Small Businesses Use Snapchat?

QZ – Music Streaming Has A Nearly Undetectable Fraud Problem

AdWeek – How Do Consumers Really Feel About Advertising?

MediaPost – Ads On Social Media Inspire A Variety Of Consumer Response

 

 

 

 


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Update: eZanga’s Michelle Brammer Is Now A Forbes Contributor

We are excited to announce that Emerging Insider has successfully established an ongoing contributorship at Forbes for eZanga’s Director of Marketing Michelle Brammer.

In her first Forbes post, Michelle goes in to greater detail about how advertisers have adopted Snapchat and why the platform has seen such rapid success recently.

Read The Article

This does not come by accident as Michelle along with her eZanga colleagues boast a strong reputation as a thought leaders in digital marketing with pieces in Entrepreneur, MediaPost, MarTech Advisors and Tech.Co to name a few.

View LinkedIn Profile

Visit eZanga.com

 

 


Ticketbis sells soccer to America

Ticketbis Sells Soccer to America

Americans love for sports should come as no surprise. Football, baseball and basketball have reigned as the country’s most beloved sporting events and have done so for decades. While these sports will forever be a staple in American culture, recently a new contender has peaked the interest of millions.

Raking in tens of billions in global revenue every year, soccer has long been the world’s most popular and profitable sport. In the United States, the global sport has previously been dismissed as a game for soccer moms and kids – that is, until recently. Ticketbis, an international secondary ticketing platform, recently released a report on soccer tourism that measured international purchases to European league matches. The “Goalnomics” report revealed that a staggering 60 percent of purchases for Premiere League matches were made by Americans. (La Liga followed second with 26 percent of American purchases)

The new found data from the Goalnomics report was so fascinating that we had to spread the news. See what Brian Blickenstaff at Vice Sports had to say about the data from our clients at Ticketbis.



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Be a PR Prose: How to Be the Industry’s Hemingway

Writing is an art, but there are so many forms that they could practically fill a dictionary: Creative writing, technical writing, poetry, newswriting, etc. The list goes on and on and on. So when you set out to put pen to paper and crank out some truly great PR writing about company news, accomplishments or anything else, how can you ensure greatness (or at least garner interest)?

Step 1. Don’t write some wackadoo, over-the-top headline like the one that sits atop this piece. Headline writing is a tricky art, but if you want to get a journalist’s attention, it’s key. It’s like those greeting cards with scantily clad men and women on the cover: You just have to see what’s inside.

So to write an attention-getting headline, be sure to keep it short and sweet (nobody knows the name of your company’s new vice co-chair or cares whether it’s in the headline); include the gist of the story, but not every single detail (“customer and consumer engagement technology application” can just be shortened to “app” for headline purposes); and still try to make it interesting. Even though they may not want to admit it, journalists appreciate a good turn of phrase and even the occasional pun, so creativity is still important.

Step 2. Once you get past the ever-daunting challenge of writing a great headline, you reach the body. This may seem easier, as this is where you get to spill all the details of your exciting news and all the great things your company is doing. But sometimes, words are all you have to convince someone that what you have to say matters, and if you don’t say it well, the audience tunes out.

So first things first, you have to hook your audience with your lede – the meat of the story and the whole reason you’re writing to begin with. If a story or press release is to, say, announce company achievements but you start with a generic explanation of the company’s background, the audience will probably be left thinking, “Why does this matter and why am I reading it?”

It’s important within the body that a story is being told. By and large, press releases are boring, but essentially so. But if there’s a unique hook in what you’re writing about, capitalize on it. And if a company executive or someone in the industry has an interesting quote about the material, great. But if it’s what PR News calls a “happy quote,” most journalists will stop reading as quickly as they can answer a trivia question about AP Style. That is, a quote that says how happy they are to welcome a new personnel member, how happy it makes them to have placed in the top 10 companies ever by a niche magazine no one’s ever heard of, or if they just cured cancer. Make sure quotes have some meat to them.

Other useful tips to follow in the body text:

  • Avoid hyperbole. Journalists can smell this from a mile away.
  • Use uniform text formatting. Don’t ever use all caps and don’t over-use exclamation points.
  • Spell things correctly and make sure everything reads well. Journalists are expected to do so to maintain credibility, and they expect you to, too.

Step 3. Wrapping things up may be the easiest part of PR writing, but don’t pay it any less attention. But if you’re following the inverted pyramid style of writing – a style that journalists know by heart in which the most important points are at the beginning of the piece and the least at the bottom – this is when you can include general company info and other items that aren’t as pertinent to the overall story.

OK, so journalists may not expect you to be Hemingway or the next Pulitzer Prize winner, but they’ll appreciate it when you hook them into a story that is well-written, grammatically correct and, most importantly, will be of interest to their readers. It may not be easy, but take a little extra time to do these things and you’ll start seeing your pitches in print.

 


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EI’s New Offerings Take the Yawn Factor Out of Content

The business world is so full of jargon that spreads like wildfire. By the time execs and professionals think outside the box, evangelize their new favorite phrases and ping them to colleagues, someone’s circling back and saying those phrases are banned due to overuse. At the end of the day, it is what it is.

In the PR, marketing and advertising worlds, there’s definitely one phrase that’s quickly losing its meaning teetering on the brink of overuse: Content. Here at Emerging Insider, we place a serious emphasis on producing content that establishes us and our clients as industry experts.

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Ad Fraud: A Force To Be Reckoned With

Advertisers may want to turn a blind eye to the elephant in the industry — ad fraud. But with bot traffic accounting for 36 percent of all web traffic and costing the industry $6 billion, they can’t afford to ignore the issue.

There are no rules or regulations — not to mention no consequences — for such fraudulent behavior, so advertisers need to be proactive with its ad strategy and spending to combat the issue. For a true by-the-numbers look at the real cost of ad fraud as outlined by a report from Emerging Insider Communications and eZanga, its mobile advertising technology client, head over to MediaPost.


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eZanga Provides Teens With an Inside Look Into the AdTech Industry

We here at Emerging Insider Communications take great pride in helping out others and giving back to the community. Seeing our clients do the same is something that tugs at our heartstrings. Our client eZanga, a digital advertising company based out of Delaware, has been doing just that.

By participating in SPARC, a community-development program that helps students and young adults entering the workforce become career ready, eZanga, has been able to give back to the community and has been helping the state of Delaware with its initiative to increase graduation rates.

eZanga provides teens with an inside look into the ad tech industry thereby providing an answer to the everyday question teens keep getting asked regardless of their respective generation: “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

eZanga along with other Delaware businesses help teens answer that question by providing them with mentors that are able to give them the necessary tools, skills, experience, and different point of views that are needed for them to make their dreams come true.

“I hope that for student’s perspectives, that they have the opportunity to work with somebody that’s not their parent, not their teacher, not a peer, not somebody from their church, but to get a different perspective from somebody that they’ve never met that could maybe help shape their career. I think that maybe if you affect only one person with SPARC and introduce them to a new career type or a different way of thinking, then there’s definitely a success, without a doubt,” said Michelle Brammer, Marketing Manager at eZanga.

Providing students with different perspectives and opportunities to explore career fields that they otherwise would not have known about is something that we here at Emerging Insider can stand behind. There’s a shortage of programs like these that help our youths become self-aware and eventually; hopefully, successful, as they are less likely to just “go with the flow” when it comes to their career choice.

This program along with the real world experience that’s provided to the teens makes eZanga’s involvement in SPARC something that we are extremely proud of and we would like to thank eZanga for doing what’s right for their community and its youth. Thank You!